poses, self-talk, YoMo

YoMo day 4: What was I thinking?

I’m going to have to write a post about obstacles to home practice at some point.  I encountered several today – baking bread, taking down the Christmas tree, checking email, and so forth.  So my practice time was abbreviated, which revealed a flaw in my stated YoMo intentions.

It’s no big deal to do one of my intended daily poses – Upavistha Konasana (seated wide angle) – apart from the struggle to stay upright.  It goes better if I do some prep poses, but if I’m in a hurry I can just wedge it into the practice.  

On the other hand, Supta Virasana requires, no, demands preparation from me.  It’s such a hard pose for my inflexible hips and legs and back that I have to do Virasana at the very least, and a couple of lunges help a lot, and Parsvakonasana gets my hips stretched out, and so on.  Then when I get into the pose I have to stay in it long enough for my knees to eventually drop to the ground, and at that point it’s silly to pop right out of it.  So the pose itself takes as much as ten minutes, five on each side because I do it Eka Pada – one leg bent in front of me and one in Virasana – to protect my low back.

That doesn’t even count the time to haul out all my props.  

In my capacity as YoMo cheerleader I can’t renege on my intentions, can I?

On the plus side, even after doing it for just four days, I can see a difference.  Today I only needed one blanket on top of the bolster.  I’m still using my large bolster, but I bet I’ll get down to the smaller one soon.  This is a far cry from my early yoga classes, where I needed a pyramid of three bolsters and a lot of self-talk to get down into this pose.

Upavista Konasana
Upavista Konasana
Supta Virasana
Supta Virasana
Virasana
Virasana
Lunge
Lunge
Utthita Parsvakonasana
Utthita Parsvakonasana

2 thoughts on “YoMo day 4: What was I thinking?”

  1. It’s really helpful to read about the poses you use to get ready to do Supta Virasana; it actually had never occurred to me that a yoga sequence may be seen as a series of building blocks, each pose (possibly) leading to another, more challenging pose. Is that how you think about putting together a sequence?

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